Phoenix Rising; May 17-21, 2007; New Orleans, LA

Presented by
Narrate Conferences, Inc.
Phoenix Rising
Phoenix Rising took place May 17-21, 2007. Please feel free to view this archival version of our website, and to visit the Narrate Conferences, Inc. website for information about future events.

Accepted Proposals

Phoenix Rising is pleased to announce information regarding the programming that will be offered on May 18, 19, and 20, 2007. For a detailed schedule of the following presentataions, please visit our Schedule page.

If you have questions about Phoenix Rising's programming, please e-mail programming@thephoenixrises.org.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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PAPERS AND LECTURES

“. . . soul as dry as the pages of the books to which you so desperately cleave”: An Analysis of Depictions of Female Academics in Harry Potter
Kathleen Turner
This presentation examines the way that female teachers are adapted from the Harry Potter novels in the films. It examines the descriptions of the female teachers in the books and explores the ways stereotypes inform the film depictions. The appearances and actions of the female teachers in the films both fulfill and defy stereotypical roles of female teachers. The Harry Potter novels and films ultimately create positive role models for young women who want to pursue academic careers.

Acquiring a Magical Literacy: Harry Potter Characters’ Transition into the Cultural Literacy of the Wizarding World
Robin Martin
By using literacy theory as a lens for literary analysis, this paper provides a fresh new examination of learning, education, character development, and literacy in the Harry Potter series. It draws from several literacy theorists to consider different approaches that certain characters take in their acquisition of a magical literacy—or rather, the cultural literacy of the magical world. By focusing on how these characters use oral and textual literacy to appropriate the cultural literacy of the Wizarding World, we may take a unique look at some of the most beloved characters of the series.

All’s Fair in Love and Wizarding War: Ethics in Harry Potter
Amber Charleville
Ethics have never been an easy subject within the field of philosophy, but they become even trickier when applied to Harry’s wizarding world. When a person carries around the power to take or save a life, harm or heal, and destroy or create on a daily basis, all with a thin wooden stick, do the rules change? When so many lives hang in the balance, where’s the line between good and evil, and how steadfast is it? In Harry’s world, is it the action, the intent, or the ultimate outcome that matters when talking about ethics?

Anything’s Possible: An Examination of the Trickster Archetype in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter Series
Layla A. Abuisba
Trickster behavior plays an important role in the plot of J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. When tricksters act, the resulting events reveal important information and create new challenges for Harry and the wizarding world. In addition, all of Rowling’s characters deepen and mature due to the challenges they experience as a result of trickster activity.

Are the Patients Running St. Mungo’s?: Usability and Harry Potter Fandom Websites
Alison Luperchio
Fandom websites have evolved significantly in the past few years. Sites that started small have grown to thousands of pages. Have these sites stayed usable, understandable, and navigable as they’ve grown? What kinds of problems can come up when the content owners and technical developers are designing the layout? This presentation / workshop will discuss principles of usability and interaction design, common mistakes made in web design, and how to evaluate a site when you’re working with volunteers and without a budget. Throughout the presentation, we’ll use real fandom website examples (and, if possible, we’ll use examples provided by the participants).
Sponsor: Hogwarts Today

Arresto Momentum?: Harry, Sirius, and Lupin
Jacqueline Goodenow
J. K. Rowling has said that Sirius Black is “a case of arrested development,” and that Remus Lupin seems older and is more mature. Yet Harry is much closer to Sirius. Why? Is it simply a matter of Sirius’s more effusive personality, his closer involvement, and his godfather status? What does Lupin mean to Harry, and can we say that Harry must necessarily become more like Lupin in order to grow up? To be better equipped against Voldemort? A study of the two men’s differences and evolving meanings to Harry will illuminate their profound impact on his coming of age.

Beyond Harry Potter: Fantasy for Fans Grades 5-10
Susan Fichtelberg, Bonnie Kunzel
Once one has finished the Harry Potter series, the next logical step is to explore the extensive body of fantasy literature written for young adults. “Beyond Harry Potter” is a presentation of the finest fantasy literature written for grades 5-10.

Blood in Her Pen, Ink in His Veins: Writing Violence in the Harry Potter Novels
Jill Treftz
This paper presents an analysis of the intersections between the written word and violence throughout the series, focusing in particular on Chamber of Secrets and Order of the Phoenix, as each book presents instances of writing used as a physical and psychical weapon. Rowling’s use of these intersections situates her novels within a long discourse of literary metacommentary on the communicative function and potential toll of composition and reinforces the critical role that language plays in the magical world.

Comparing the Magical and Muggle Communications Networks: Using Muggle Engineering as the Basis for “Magiceering” Wizarding Technologies in Fanfic
Carrie Harris (Droxy)
Muggle communications technology can be explained in non-technical terms and compared to Harry Potter magic. Reverse engineering / deconstruction methods are employed on the Floo, magic mirrors, and magical photos, building the foundation for writers to create and expand functional magic based on Muggle technologies such as the internet, television, radio, and telephony-computer integration. This presentation explores how to magically solve modern networking issues such as security, congestion, and integration, as well as explores differences between Muggle and magical world cultural acceptance of new magic and technology. Learn to enhance your fan creations by deconstructing technology and “magiceering” to create your own enchanted communication products and infrastructure.

Costuming Choices in the Harry Potter Films
Tarie (OfScarletWoman)
When bringing a book to life on film, many changes are required to make the transition as smooth as possible. In the Harry Potter films, some of the most notable changes are the costumes. To the untrained eye, these changes may seem unnecessary. However, the costume designer has myriad valid reasons for the costume design choices made. This presentation will explore a number of key costume changes and choices in the Harry Potter films, as well as several design theories behind them.

The Creative Lab: Fandom Infringement of Copyrights and a Proposed Exception for Experimental Use
Rachael Stiegel
Almost all fandom activity—fan fiction, fan art, vidding, and podcasts—constitutes infringement of intellectual property that is not owned by the fans engaging in the activity. Although J. K. Rowling has arguably authorized use under certain circumstances, the prolific activities of the Harry Potter fandom raise larger issues about fan culture and legal policy. This presentation (based on a law review article) includes a summary of the different types of intellectual property in the American legal system and examines a proposal to borrow the experimental use doctrine from patent law to carve out a fandom exception for copyright infringement.

The Dread of Opals: What Folklore Reveals about the Harry Potter Septology
Katherine E. Krohn
Three sets of opals appear within the first six volumes of J. K. Rowling’s novels: the cursed necklace, Mme. Maxime’s rings, and the opal-stoppered vial in the Black mansion. This presentation uses folklore methodology to trace associations of opals and predict what may next befall the wizarding community. Opals, said to keep one’s vision clear while clouding that of others (cf. “Hand of Glory”), turn pale when near poison, and change their appearances to indicate whether illness or injury looms over their owners. They also confer prophetic power if used for good, and may protect children from predatory beasts.

Evil and the Loss of Identity in the Harry Potter Series
Annette Doblix Klemp
Through her depiction of Voldemort and his followers—particularly Quirinus Quirrell, Peter Pettigrew, and Barty Crouch—J. K. Rowling presents a powerful argument that an alliance with evil leads to loss of freedom and, eventually, to the loss of personal identity. Quirrell loses control of his own body; Pettigrew lives as a rat and a despised servant; Crouch goes from imprisonment in Azkaban to the impersonation of Mad-Eye Moody. Rather than romanticizing Voldemort, Rowling stresses that his overreaching and the severing of his own soul lead directly to his physically grotesque state and a life dominated by his fear of Harry.

Exploring the Leitmotif in the Music of Harry Potter
Charlotte Pipes
Composers who create music for movies often employ a compositional device called a leitmotif. It is a kind of musical label for a character, place, thing, or idea. This associative use of a melody is readily apparent in the Harry Potter movies. Composers John Williams and Patrick Doyle carefully choose the elements of their music to depict certain characters and plot lines of the movies. The composers can then use these melodies to create a unified symphonic network of sound that influences the mind of the movie-goer.

“Fame clearly isn’t everything”: The Enduring Lessons of Severus Snape
Lauryn Angel-Cann
This paper analyzes Professor Snape’s relationship to Harry Potter from a pedagogical standpoint. When Snape’s teaching methods are compared to those of his colleagues at Hogwarts—particularly Professor McGonagall—it becomes apparent that Harry learns more from Professor Snape than from any other teacher. Although his personality leaves much to be desired as far as Harry is concerned, Snape proves himself to be Harry’s most effective teacher, since his lessons in morality and self-defense endure throughout the series and save Harry’s life on more than one occasion.

Fandom, Fanon and the Post-Canon Continuum
Maud O’Bedlam
“Fanon” is the oft-perjorative label that fans attach to so many of the elements of fandoms, from theories and predictions to ways of writing an individual character. Fanon is, however, an inevitable by-product of fandom activity, even activities which put a high premium on “canonicity.” Formed through the interaction of the canon text with outside sources, fanon is comparable to a linguistic creole—and as with creoles, there is a post-canon continuum of fanonical concepts that approaches, but never reaches, the ideal of “absolutely canon.”

Fantasy’s Rebirth: Reconciling the Hero’s and Heroine’s Journeys
Valerie Estelle Frankel
Why does the grander-scale “boy story” entice watchers more than the quieter girl story? Why do both genders run to Harry Potter, even with the series’ male hero? Is there a heroine who journeys on the epic scale of Star Wars and Harry Potter? The hero and heroine’s respective journeys operate in contrast because the hero quests for external power in lavish epics with extended battles, while the heroine quests for internal power as ruler of the family.

The Goblin Financial Monopoly
Richard
There is only one bank in wizarding Britain: Gringotts, run by goblins. That fact gives goblins a financial monopoly and immense power over both wizarding society and the Ministry of Magic. What does this say about the structure of magical Britain? About the Ministry? About the rights of goblins? What about the opportunity for Voldemort to ally with goblins and wage economic warfare?

Gothic Harry: Connecting to Teens’ Self-Discovery Journeys
Tricia Sindel-Arrington
The Gothic genre is a largely forgotten one. Its name has been besmirched by cheap imitations and spin-offs, while its value as a serious literary genre has degenerated. Add to this the relative inaccessibility of good Gothic literature that is appropriate for teenagers’ classroom study: it is a literary form that has been greatly misrepresented and almost entirely ignored in junior high and middle schools. Unfortunately, teachers and parents often overlook twentieth-century literature as a viable Gothic choice. J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books are modern Gothic novels which incorporate symbols to create vivid imagery while connecting to the adolescent’s self-discovery journey.

The Grand Unified Horcrux Theory
Donna Lafferty
This paper presents a canon-based analysis of known Horcruxes, including how they interact with wizards, what their abilities are, the level of knowledge they possess, their level of independence, and their tendency to react to the proximity of Voldemort himself. I will use this analysis to extrapolate the nature and location of the remaining Horcruxes, and determine a plausible course for Harry et al. to follow in their efforts to defeat Voldemort. And yes, Harry’s scar is the final Horcrux.
Sponsor: Knockturn Alley

Hagrid, Naturally
Mark E. Hayes
This paper explores Rubeus Hagrid’s character as a figure who represents and synthesizes several views of “the natural.”

Harnessing Magic with a Pencil: Mary GrandPré’s Illustrations of the U.S. Editions of Harry Potter
Kathryn Loup
Mary GrandPré’s illustrations influence many American readers’ perceptions of the Harry Potter series. Her drawings help to set the stage for each chapter, previewing the events to come or simply adding visual richness to the story. In this presentation, I will examine a selection of the book illustrations and discuss what may have motivated GrandPré’s choice of subjects, how the illustrations interact with the text and how they fit with each book as a whole.

Harry on the Couch: A Psychologist’s Reading of Harry Potter
Joanne Macgregor
This paper examines psychological aspects of the Harry Potter books. Aspects of psychopathology embodied in various creatures and possible diagnoses for characters are hypothesized. Erikson’s theory of psycho-social development is applied to Harry and other characters, as well as Freud’s id, ego and super-ego constructs, to analyse Harry Potter triads. Neuropsychological aspects of brain damage, memory-impairment and legilimancy are discussed. Psychometric aspects of the sorting hat, Mirror of Erised, animagi and patronuses are examined. Spells and charms as psychotherapeutic techniques, and potions as psychopharmacological equivalents are considered. Finally, the Phoenix’s birth-death-rebirth cycle is discussed as a metaphor for the therapeutic process.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Colonialism
Tracy Douglas
This paper seeks to place J. K. Rowling’s fourth novel within the wider context of the British literature canon’s tendency to define the foreigner against a characterization of English identity. Harry and other men participate in objectifying female foreigners. Foreign characters stand out with their inability to speak English properly. Evil and monstrosity come out of the East by associating Voldemort with Albania. The colonialism that is flushed out in the series presents England at the forefront in the status quo politics of the Ministry of Magic, which is undercut by Rowling’s support of Dumbledore’s vision of global unification.

The Harry Potter World as Existential Inspiration for Gifties
Paula Christensen
“Gifties” is a term used by many students identified as gifted in school. They often think and feel in different ways from other students. Existential philosophy can be one way to direct gifted individuals to reach their potential. The Harry Potter world provides rich content and context that can provide inspiration for gifties. Gifted students have shared how the Harry Potter world helps them in making choices, finding purpose, and being responsible for their lives. This presentation provides information about how gifted students gain existential inspiration from Harry Potter.

The Heir of Slytherin: Niccolò Machiavelli and the House of Salazar
JoSelle Vanderhooft
Much like several Muggle leaders, the political authorities of Harry Potter’s world appear to have borrowed suggestions from sixteenth-century statesman Niccolò Machiavelli, whose seminal treatise on power and statecraft, The Prince, remains a controversial political work. This paper will examine the effectiveness with which leaders like Cornelius Fudge, Rufus Scrimgeour, Dolores Umbridge, Lord Voldemort, and Albus Dumbledore employ traditionally identified “Machiavellian” techniques such as force, intimidation, and deception in their attempts to seize or maintain political power, and the moral ramifications of these attempts. It will also seek to place Rowling’s work in a centuries-old line of Machiavellian scholarship.

The Hero’s Journey
Paula Christensen
The Harry Potter novels provide unique perspectives on the familiar story of the hero. A comparison of Harry Potter’s journey to other heroes’ journeys in literature illustrates why these novels are as discerning as the classics of literature and are relevant and valuable. Harry’s heroic journey also gives readers insights that can aid in their own heroic journey of self-discovery and growth. This presentation compares Harry Potter with other heroes from literature, provides insights into personal growth, and suggests how the Harry Potter stories can help in each person’s life journey.

Hogwarts: A History
Harper Robertson
This presentation seeks to portray Hogwarts accurately, using information provided in the Harry Potter series. By combing the series for every quotation, reference books for every fortress, and the Internet for every other clue, Robertson shows how text builds the castle that we imagine.

“I never do anything twice!” —Stephen Sondheim. “I always do everything at least twice” —attributed to J. K. Rowling.
Diana Patterson
J. K. Rowling is a master of repetition, yet her repetition never garners our contempt. Sometimes it does not even garner our attention, but rather builds the story to be strong and believable. This repetition has nothing to do with foreshadowing; instead, it actually increases our wonder and surprise.

If You Can’t Go to Hogwarts: Bringing Harry Potter to Life for Adolescents
Macy Joseph III, Sarah Leadbeater
Keeping twenty to forty eleven- and twelve-year-olds busy for an hour a week, forty-two times a year, is no simple task. Unlike adults, these kids are not merely content to gather and discuss their favorite characters or pairings. Instead, they expect to become a part of the world they love. From sorting ceremonies to wand-making, potions class to dueling in the halls, join us as we share the secrets of running a successful Harry Potter club.

In Defense of the Daily Prophet: Would You Have Printed the Voldemort Story?
Kayla Castille
As the newspaper of record for the wizarding world, the Daily Prophet no doubt made Harry Potter’s life miserable when it initially refused to acknowledge the return of Lord Voldemort. But what did the newspaper and its editors know, and when did they know it? This presentation will examine the Daily Prophet’s decision not to run the Voldemort story using modern Muggle media conventions, and discuss whether the newspaper should have taken the word of a fourteen-year-old student over the Minister of Magic.

J. K. Rowling’s Creation of Names as Memory Hooks
Alleen Pace Nilsen
This presentation explores eight techniques that Rowling uses to make her names memorable enough that they will stick in readers’ minds not only for six hundred pages of a book, but also long afterwards. When readers pick up the “latest” Harry Potter book, more than a year may have elapsed since they last read about the characters. Her techniques include devising descriptive names, using innovative spelling, playing with phonology, playing with morphemes, creating sets of names, reinforcing her names with later jokes, alluding to mythological characters, and basing many names on Latin roots.

J. K. Rowling’s Narrative Turn: Harry Potter and “The War on Terror”
Gwen A. Tarbox
This paper concerns the clear difference between the novels that J. K. Rowling wrote before 2001 and those that she has written since the U.S. and Britain engaged themselves in “The War on Terror.” Rowling’s commentary on contemporary social life has become progressively darker and more critical of cultural institutions. If the earlier books in the series were designed to engage children’s sense of wonder, it would appear that the later texts are designed to encourage children’s skepticism of the current geopolitical situation.

J. K. Rowling—Better than a Kaplan Course for Developing Vocabulary
Don L. F. Nilsen
J. K. Rowling’s generative (process) approach to creating new words out of well-known morphemes, which are the smallest parts of language that carry meaning, is extremely important in today’s “flat” world of media communication and the development across language and cultural boundaries of concepts, inventions, and attitudes that need immediately understandable names. Readers come away from the Harry Potter books not only with increased vocabulary skills but also with knowledge of language processes, which enable them to be creative in their own writing as well as in figuring out the meanings of words they have not met before.

Loss and Grief in Harry Potter
Victoria Hippard
In the opening chapter of Sorcerer’s Stone, we learn that Harry faces the aftermath of the death of his parents, an attempt on his life, an interesting but disfiguring scar, mistreatment, and loneliness. Rowling’s feelings about the loss of her mother find their way into her writings about Harry and Voldemort. As in real life, the family backgrounds of Harry and Voldemort—although both have lost parents—reflect differences in how each handles early childhood events. Like an experienced depth psychologist, Rowling relies on the past and the Pensieve to amplify these differences in development.

Marketing “Fast Food” Curriculum: Scholastic’s Foray into Reading Instruction
Martha Young Rhymes
Scholastic, Inc.’s influence on reading instruction is explored through a textual analysis of Literature Guides created to accompany their blockbuster series, J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter. I posit that an author’s ideological messages concerning gender, race, and class take on a strengthened legitimacy when placed within the institution of schooling. Having taught the books myself, I offer a critical examination of the guides and the reading approaches suggested by their author, Linda Ward Beech, while questioning the involvement of corporate publishers who create curriculum as commodity.

The Mary Sue Project: Writing Fanfiction in the Classroom
Lelac Almagor
In a fifth-grade classroom, students write their own Mary Sue stories: fanfiction in which they become main characters in their favorite novels. They deconstruct the literature in order to construct a place for themselves, a task made more difficult at times by the limitations—racial, cultural, and literary—of the fantasy universes they hope to claim and inhabit.

Mature Poets Steal: Fanfiction and the Literary Tradition
Catherine Tosenberger
Most academic studies of fandom have focused upon fanfiction as merely a byproduct of the larger phenomenon of fandom, rather than as art in its own right. This presentation will articulate fanfiction in terms of a literary tradition of what can be called “recursive” literature: that is, literature that makes use of pre-existing characters and/or plots to create new stories. With an emphasis on Harry Potter, the presentation will include a historical overview of recursive literature, as well as a discussion of how fanfiction—recursive literature that circulates unofficially—makes use of the artistic processes unique to recursive texts.
Sponsor: The Sugar Quill

The Medium is the Message: Mass Media in the Wizarding World
Kirstee Byrne, Kayla Castille
Wizards get their news from an animated newspaper and their entertainment from a wireless radio, while Muggles surf the net, buy DVDs and watch news instantly on cable television. Is media the one area in which Muggle technology surpasses wizarding innovation? Muggleborn witches and wizards surely bring a knowledge of Muggle media with them as they enter the magical world, so why isn’t there a magical version of television? If the medium is the message, what does this tell us about media in the wizarding world, where variations in media are minimal? This presentation will look at the differences between the prolific Muggle media and the subdued wizarding media, and the effects each media system has on its inhabitants.

Monstrous Regiment of One: Dolores Umbridge as Villain and . . . (anti)Feminist Icon?
JoSelle Vanderhooft
Dolores Umbridge. The mention of her name typically evokes disgust, frustration, even outright rage in Harry Potter fans. Yet, for all her vileness, she is still a powerful character, and one who may be far more nuanced than she appears. This paper will examine Hogwarts’ least favorite headmistress as the latest in a long line of fictional female villains who wield extraordinary political and personal power. By examining the ways in which Umbridge adheres to and flouts the traditional trope of the female villain, it will seek to uncover Rowling’s thoughts about what can happen when women rulers go bad.

Muggle Magic: Have They Caught Up With Us?
Ruth N. Roulston
As Mrs. Weasley said, “Muggles do know more than we give them credit for.” This presentation will explore the point to some extent, comparing accomplishments in the Muggle world with those of the Wizarding World. How far do the two worlds overlap? What can wizards do that Muggles can’t, and vice versa? Is the International Confederation of Wizards’ Statute of Secrecy in danger of being obsolete?

Muggles Are Not Aberrations: A Genetic Look at the Harry Potter Series
Genii Grimsley
The Harry Potter series is an intricate series with plenty of mysteries left to uncover. One of these mysteries is the inheritance of magic. The release of the Black family tree was the key to discovering the genetic secrets of magic. While there have been questions of recessive and dominate traits, perhaps the true answer lies not with wizards, but with the muggles, muggleborns, squibs and mutation. Come and uncover the truth of magical genetics at this presentation.

Muggling Through: Muggleborns and Half-bloods, and Their Place in the Wizarding World
Yolanda Carroll
The Wizarding World has some societal prejudices regarding bloodlines. Not everyone feels this way; unfortunately, however, some of the more influential and well-to-do members of the Wizarding World subscribe to these beliefs religiously. This paper examines the attitudes of the wizarding world toward Muggleborns and half-bloods, as well as those characters’ attitudes toward themselves.

No Mary Sues in Slash: Gender Envy in Erotic Fanfiction
Lelac Almagor
Slash writers often express contempt for the heterosexual Mary Sue story, which they perceive as “too close to the ‘sentimental love religion’ of the romance novel.” But I argue that slash fiction is in fact a more radical and less hopeful response to the same fear and worry surrounding female sexuality that motivates the heterosexual romance. Slash authors and audiences construct sexual power and success as impossible in a female body, but readily attainable in a male body. The hard question is whether the work of slash can contribute materially to the alleviation of the discontent it expresses.

No One’s Perfect: The Untamed Mary Sue in Harry Potter Fan Writing
A.M.P.
In November of 2003, the seed of an idea for a Mary Sue story became a full-fledged fanfiction novel that garnered tens of thousands of page views and a fan base that sent hundreds of e-mails and reviews. However, the readers left behind feedback demanding that the author cease writing for all time. This presentation, based on the publication and pillory of the Araminta Malfoy-Potter stories on Fanfiction.net, will explore issues of reader entitlement and whether the dreaded Mary Sue should be sent to the gallows. Self-inserts welcome.
Sponsor: The Sue March

No Wizard Left Behind: A Comparison of the “No Child Left Behind” Legislation and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Hilary Pollack
At first glance the magic of Harry Potter has little to do with the federal legislation that governs much of what transpires in U.S. schools. A closer look, however, reveals some similarities between the role that the Bush administration has taken to attempt to ensure quality education for all children, and the efforts of the Ministry of Magic to control the teachers and students of the Hogwarts academy in J. K. Rowling’s mythical land. This paper explores the consequences of federal involvement in education and investigates the similarity between the basic tenets of No Child Left Behind and the role of the Ministry of Magic at Hogwarts. The basic principles of NCLB are examined in the context of Hogwarts and through the eyes of Harry Potter, his friends, and his teachers.

O.W.L.S. and Knuts: Playfulness and Its Translation in Harry Potter
Nancy K. Jentsch
This paper examines the functions of playfulness in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, then takes a careful look at various translations of this playful language and content. The translator’s many challenges are discussed, as are some successful and less-successful solutions that have been published. Examples from the Czech, French, German and Spanish translations of the first six Harry Potter books will be presented.

Of Horcruxes, Arithmancy, Etymology and Egyptology: A Literary Detective’s Guide to Patterns and Paradigms in Harry Potter
Hilary K. Justice (Ariadne)
Who’s going to die? What is Snape’s Patronus? What’s up with the Horcruxes, and why is the World Mythology book stuck shut on jkrowling.com? Combining cognitive linguistics, historical mythology, and mathematical semiotics, this presentation will propose answers to these questions and argue that the answers have already been provided by J. K. Rowling in the first six books.

An Ordinary Hero: Neville Longbottom and the Hero’s Path
Layla A. Abuisba
J. K. Rowling has described Neville Longbottom, a character in her Harry Potter series, as an “ordinary wizarding boy” who was “so nearly king.” Because of Rowling’s realistic portrayal of Neville, many readers may identify with Neville’s personal struggle. He may be timid at times, but he also displays a desire for self-improvement and a strong inner core of determination. Neville independently pursues his own hero’s path in order to fulfill his personal destiny.

“Original Character” Is Not a Four-Letter Word
Jennifer Racek (Tapestry)
The fastest way to drive readers away is to tell them that your fanfiction features an original character. What is this dreaded creature, and why does it strike fear into the fandom heart? Are all original characters thinly disguised Mary and Gary Sues?

“A power he will never know”: Love, Public Space, and (National) Salvation in Harry Potter
Skyler Hijazi
When Dumbledore tells Harry that it is Harry’s capacity to love which will enable him to defeat Lord Voldemort and thus to save the Wizarding world, he unmasks love as a matter of constant public concern, a matter always-already freighted with political and ideological implications. This paper examines constructions of love, sexuality, and desire in the Harry Potter series and the part they play in shaping a narrative landscape in which kinship, intimacy, and blood ties are figured as matters of “good” and “evil,” life and death, not only for individual characters but for the Wizarding world writ large.

The Prisoner and the Patriarchy: Family Secrets in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Brandy Ball Blake
The Harry Potter series draws on many literary genres, but only one novel in this series emphasizes the traditions of the Gothic Novel. To assert that book three and only book three in the series is a Gothic Novel suggests that Rowling needed the conventions of the genre to prove a point at this particular moment in her series. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban utilizes Gothic traditions in order to emphasize the novel’s focus on fear, family, and weakness, particularly the weakness of the patriarchal line and the rebirth of its strength in Harry.

Reading, Reviewing, and Recommending: Fanfiction vs. “Real-world” Publishing
Carlie Webber
Should a fanfiction review look like something out of Publishers Weekly? Could a professional reviewer learn a thing or two from fandom? At this presentation, you’ll hear about the differences in fanfiction reviewing and recommending versus that of published works, including some of the debate over whether to publish any kind of negative reviews. You’ll also have an inside look at how some professional book lists and awards are put together, and how the selection criteria for those recommendations and awards differs from their fanfiction counterparts.

Resounding Fantasy and Seeking Pleasure: Brad Neely’s Hideously Fabulous Wizard People, Dear Reader
Katie Brewer Ball
My paper examines Wizard People, Dear Reader, an audio performance created by comic book artist Brad Neely which accompanies the 1999 film Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Employing Fred Moten’s concept of “phonic materiality” to discuss the noises, breaks, and ruptures made in renarration and the loaded question of ethics and pleasure in listening, I trace Wizard People’s potential as a manifestation beside the other Harry Potters of the world. I suggest that Neely’s homophobic genderqueer moves and his ambiguous desire to pervert Harry Potter makes Wizard People a space of romantically real escapes. (Proxy presenter: Suzanne Scott)

Riding a Broomstick out of Plato’s Cave: Elements of Plato found in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter Series
Camille W. Parker
J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series has become a cultural phenomenon. Beneath the phenomenon status, there is great depth. This paper looks at aspects of the novels which mirror elements found in Plato’s The Republic, specifically his allegory of the cave in Book Seven. Plato’s allegory of the cave illustrates “four stages” of understanding. The Harry Potter series contains characters who fall in each of these four stages. Through these characters, we see that the “highest form of knowledge” comes only when one is able to understand and respect both one’s own community and that of the other.

S.P.E.W.ing Slavery: The Peculiar Institution in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter Series
Emily Honey
This paper is an examination of the institution of slavery as it exists among the house elves at Hogwarts. More specifically, it scrutinizes the ways in which Harry, Ron, and other characters sanction the position of elves. I argue that the hierarchy of J. K. Rowling’s magical world reveals a class-based way of thinking and ruling that allows wizards (including Harry) to stay at the top of the social and economic ladder, while creating involuntary servitude and personal self-loathing among the elves. (Proxy presenter: Gwen A. Tarbox)

Salamangka: A Look into the Filipino Potter Fandom Experience
Cherie M. del Rio
The vast scope of the Filipino Potter fandom culture is explored through a presentation of the group dynamics, activities, and general structure of Hogwarts Philippines, the largest and foremost organization of Pinoy Potterheads. An in-depth discussion of the group’s general nature provides an extensive look not only at the Filipino fandom experience but also at the behavior, passions, and dedications of Potter fans from the country.

Scattered Ashes: The Phoenix Falls
William Bryan Davis
A recurring trend in all six of the current Harry Potter novels is the fact that Harry has been close to death on numerous occasions but has somehow managed to escape it each time. It may seem a futile and fleeting thing to ponder Harry’s fate (since that question will be answered shortly), but it is also irresistible, given the overwhelming evidence that suggests he will be a tragic hero. This literary analysis will focus on Harry’s symbolic role as a phoenix and will ponder his potential fate at the end of the seventh, hitherto unpublished novel.

Sirius Black: The Face of Eleggua in the Potterverse
Vivienne D’Avalon
This paper discusses many attributes that Sirius Black shares with the Voudon trickster, Legba (Eleggua in Santería). Eleggua is a shapeshifter, delights in dangerous pranks, and manifests as a black dog. Sirius’ “joke” of luring Snape to possible death is a classic Eleggua prank. Sirius is Harry’s link to his parents, and Eleggua is a link to the ancestors. Eleggua guards the gateway between the world of the living and the dead, and enables communication between them. Sirius may be a vital connection for Harry, therefore, when he needs help from the other side of the veil.

Stop Cruelty Toward Magical Creatures
Elizabeth Olive Hornby-Hamilton, Janice M. Humperdink
Back in the mid-1800s, Amber Humperdink was appalled by how muggles treated their animals, until she took a closer look at her own world’s abuse of magical creatures. By 1869, Amber’s Creature Rescue and Protection (C.R.A.P.) magical animal-welfare society was incorporated. Today, C.R.A.P.’s mission continues its protection and advocacy of magical creatures. It focuses on the illegal possession of exotic creatures, the unethical handling and use of dragons, the inhumane treatment of Gnomes, bite-prevention, and more.

Tricked or Fooled?: Rowling’s Mastery of the Art of Misdirection
Phyllis D. Morris
Scabbers the wizard, Mad-Eye the imposter, Sirius the hero, Quirrell the villain—over and over, J. K. Rowling displays her mastery of the art of misdirection in the Harry Potter series. You are cordially invited to join Phyllis Morris as she explores the ways in which Rowling successfully tricks us—and find out why we happily succumb time and time again.

Turban Legend: A Different Perspective on P-p-poor P-p-professor Quirrell
Constance Vigilance
Generally discarded as flotsam of an expository narrative, Professor Quirrell nonetheless offers many intriguing pathways of discovery. This paper will present canonical arguments why the multi-countenanced professor could be the defining character in an epic tale about personal choice.

Understanding Prejudice Utilizing the Harry Potter Series
Nancee Lee-Allen
Harry Potter’s world is full of prejudicial ideas, though not the ones found in our world. In Harry’s world, people are not discriminated against for the color of their skin, religious affiliation, or sexual identity; it is all about blood—pure, half or muggle. Teens easily identify with characters and are able to relate to the idea of prejudice in the magic world. These books allow us to explore inner feelings about people who are different without identifying anyone as a real-world racist, which can lead to a better understanding of ourselves and begin to build respect for those who are different.

Voldemort Can’t Stop the Rock: Hot Topic, Wizard Rock and Harry Potter Punk
Suzanne Scott
Distinctions between subculture and popular culture have always been highly subjective and tenuous, as we strive to define the point at which subversive cultural practice becomes too common or populist to be meaningful. This project aims to interrogate the invisible fault lines that continue to provoke (sub)cultural debates around that most elusive, desirable commodity of all: authenticity. The two focal nodes of this investigation, Harry Potter merchandise sold at Hot Topic and the emergence and production of the musical subgenre of “Wizard Rock,” embody the tensions between populism and subversion that engage cultural theorists and fandom scholars.

When Wands Become Brushes: Painting the Magical Real
Marjorie Cohee Manifold
What do youth who create and share fanart illustrations in online communities have to say about the role of art in their lives? How do they learn to create these often highly sophisticated artworks? Why do they choose to create fanart? This presentation, which draws on information gathered from interviews with fan artists from around the world, with a focus on Potterean art, turns attention on an aesthetic expression as a global-cultural phenomenon. Fascinating insights into the valued roles of imagination and imagic art in the everyday lives of contemporary adolescents and young adults are revealed.

Where Did She Come From?: The Not-so-new Ginny Weasley
Yolanda Carroll
In Order of the Phoenix, Ginny’s characterization came as a bit of a shock to some readers. However, the girl we see crying at King’s Cross in Philosopher’s Stone and the teenager we see fighting Death Eaters in Order of the Phoenix and Half-Blood Prince are the same person. This presentation explores how both her character and her relationship with Harry have developed over the course of the books. It also examines why J. K. Rowling has chosen to handle Ginny’s character as she has.
Sponsor: The Harry/Ginny OTP Newsletter

Where You’ll Meet Your True Friends
Sister Magpie
From his first appearance, Draco Malfoy has been the face and voice of the Pureblood Agenda at Hogwarts. Whether introducing us to the word “Mudblood” or bragging about dark, secret missions, Draco is Voldemort’s enthusiastic cheerleader. Is Draco just a nasty mouthpiece for Voldemort? Or has his characterization always held clues to the power that will defeat him? In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Draco’s story dramatizes the central conflict of the character, which turns out to mirror the very conflict around which the story is based: to choose the Dark Lord, or the Power He Knows Not? This discussion will examine Draco’s desire for and frustrations with true human connection, and his choice of bigotry as a false solution.

Why Heather Can Write and Other Tales from the Front Lines of Participatory Culture
Henry Jenkins
Henry Jenkins will read selections from Convergence Culture, Fans, Gamers, and Bloggers and from his blog at henryjenkins.org, sharing his thoughts on the ways fandom in general and Harry Potter in particular have shaped contemporary culture.
Sponsor: Knockturn Alley

World Influences on Harry Potter from Asiatic Anti-Venoms to Zombies
Janet Neilson
J. K. Rowling draws from global sources for inspiration for everything from spells to magical creatures. These sources are woven throughout the text to create depth and a sense of cultures beyond the one in which Harry lives. This discussion will provide insight into some of the most interesting and most obscure references, including Afro-Caribbean inspiration for Inferi and Greek sources for Abraxan horses.

Young Readers’ Responses to Harry Potter: What We Know, and What We Don’t
Colette Drouillard
This paper considers which elements academic researchers perceive as motivating young readers to read the Harry Potter series, as well as the methods they have utilized to identify these motivations. From a close examination of peer-reviewed research articles, six themes of young reader response have been identified. Three categories of research methodologies were found to be most frequently utilized to obtain these responses.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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PRE-EMPANELED PAPERS

Magical Spaces in a Muggle World
Vincent Moore (moderator), Karen M. Bayne, Tilia Klebenov Jacobs, Sherry R. Truffin
The Harry Potter universe straddles both reality and a magical world. Using ideas such as the gothic, magic realism, the sacred and the profane, the gothic nature of schools, and the division between magical and nonmagical spaces, this panel discusses the precarious place that Harry Potter holds in views of reality.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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PANELS

Daddy, I Want to Be a Death Eater: Character Studies Based on Nature vs. Nurture in Canon and Fanon
Mariella Bozzuto, Valerie Diaz, Samantha Rose
The Nature vs. Nurture debate is one that will never die. Is someone born with a certain trait, or is it a product of their environment? We will be looking at a variety of characters from the Harry Potter series from a Nature vs. Nurture perspective in both canon and fanon. Some of the characters we will explore include the Malfoys, Lord Voldemort, Severus Snape, the Marauders, Harry Potter, the Weasleys, and the Death Eaters and their children. We will look at how environmental and genetic factors affect their personalities, house placements, social interactions and intelligence in both canon and fanon.

Fan Journalism: The Importance of Not Being Skeeter
Melissa Anelli, Sue Upton
There’s more to being a Harry Potter reporter than red carpets and set visits. For an unknown fan site to become grassroots press—for it to be taken seriously by movie studios, publishing houses and certain British authors—requires years of persistence and vast juggling abilities. Balancing devotion to the fans, the franchise, the author, your Web site and the truth—while remembering to have fun along the way—can be daunting. Melissa Anelli and Sue Upton from The Leaky Cauldron will present this discussion on what it takes to get the coverage and interviews you want, keep your fans informed and entertained, and report responsibly on something you love.
Sponsor: Simply Undeniable

Fan Podcasting: Wizards on the Wireless
Melissa Anelli, John Noe, Sue Upton
The evolution of Harry Potter podcasts has meant a new voice for Potter fans, new ways to express and enjoy our fannishness, and new ways to collaborate, meet, discuss, theorize and connect with each other during this marvelous time. Producing a regular podcast takes patience, creativity, persistence, organization, drive and (most of all) enthusiasm. Join Melissa Anelli, John Noe, Sue Upton and editors of PotterCast for this presentation and discussion session on how to create, maintain, enliven and enjoy your Harry Potter podcast and the community it spawns.

Flames or Embers: The Future of Fandom on the Internet
Katherine Calore, Katherine DelGiudice, Michelle K. Gardner, Henry Jenkins
The Communications Act of 1934 is currently under multiple legislative reviews that will change how fandoms network with the Internet and each other. With millions of fans in thousands of Internet-based fandom communities communicating daily—hourly—instantly, we need to be aware of the storm brewing in Washington, D.C., that threatens to drastically alter Internet fandom interaction. This panel will provide information about such legislation and how it may modify the way you as an individual—and all of us as a fandom—are “on-line.”

Hatred of a Child: The Dursleys and the Malfoys through Harry’s Eyes
Genii Grimsley, Kate Herndon, Stephanie Zoutenbier
One strong theme in the Harry Potter series is the power of love and how it influences others. Hatred is another highlighted theme. For Harry, two families come to mind regarding their hatred towards him. Within the Muggle world his relatives, the Dursleys, despise him. In the wizarding world, he is hated by the Malfoys. Although these two families come from two separate worlds and never meet, Harry sees them in the same light. Join us as we discuss how Harry sees the similarities in these two families and how their hatred has influenced him.

Midwifing the Muse
abigail, Danijo, Maud O’Bedlam, Tempest Of Dreams
A beta reader is a metaphorical midwife, facilitating the author’s task of transforming an idea into a story. Beta tasks may range from purely cosmetic to a deep involvement in the creative process. To what point is the beta process itself a creative act? How do beta readers negotiate the line between beta and co-author? And how do different definitions of “beta” fit into this framework?

Project Lève: The Fan as Citizen Journalist
Aja, Erica George
Project Lève is an experiment in citizen journalism led by longtime members of Harry Potter fandom. Drawn to stories of hope after destruction, of fighting injustice and rebuilding the city of New Orleans, Project Lève brings voices from the world of post-Katrina New Orleans to Phoenix Rising’s attendees. Join us to see a glimpse of the new New Orleans through the eyes of its citizens, the people who know and love it best.

Shipping the Velvet: Slash Fandom, Convergence, and Why You Should Care About Harry Potter Mpreg
Aja, Erica George, Henry Jenkins, Mathilde Madden, Catherine Tosenberger
Slash fanfiction is an ever-expanding and ever-controversial subject among fandom, academia, and the media industry. But what are its connections to larger trends in pop culture and modes of artistic expression? This panel is not yet another attempt to validate slash or to explain why straight women write it. Instead, we will present slash as an authentic literary genre (yes, even mpreg), and examine its role in contemporary literature and pop culture. We will also be looking at its function within a convergence culture and discussing the ideas of our guest panelist, Phoenix Rising keynote speaker Henry Jenkins.

Slash: What Is It and Why Do You Write It?
Anise, Annamaria Lombino (Titti), Saber ShadowKitten
Slash has been around since the 1960s; however, it’s always been considered a well-kept secret within fandom. With the explosion of Harry Potter, slash has become visible and popular. Authors and mainstream media are aware of the phenomenon, and have tried to find explanations that have often further marginalized slashers. However, fans have their own reasons to write and read slash, some of which they aren’t comfortable discussing with anyone but other fans. The panel will flesh out the development of slash in the Harry Potter fandom, and why so many people are interested in it.

Snape: Friend or Foe?
Joanna Goldstein (moderator), Meg Belviso, Michael C. Bolton, Hilary K. Justice (Ariadne), Nick Rhein, Suzanne Scott, Rachael Stiegel
Severus Snape is a powerful and gifted wizard—one who possesses great wit, no small amount of cunning and a certain ruthlessness. His hatred of Harry Potter and his reluctance to cross the Dark Lord are clear; his allegiances, however, are a mystery. This panel will bring Snape experts, both supporters and detractors, together to ask: Is Snape loyal to Dumbledore and a friend to Harry Potter? Or is Snape loyal to Voldemort, and therefore a foe? This panel discussion will be videocast by Borders, Inc. following the conference.
Sponsor: Borders, Inc., as part of The Great Snape Debate

Sonorus: A Look at Harry Potter Podcasting and Its Effects on the Fandom
Robert Standring, Rachael Stiegel
This panel discussion by Harry Potter podcasters will focus on the past, present, and future of podcasting in the Harry Potter fandom. Anyone with a microphone and recording software can produce a podcast and distribute it on the internet free of charge. Podcasting has become a particularly popular phenomenon in the Harry Potter fandom. This discussion reflects on the history of Harry Potter-related podcasting, its evolution throughout the life of the fandom, and its impact on individual fans.

Specifying Gen
Cedar, Starrysummer
Genfic is more often defined by what it isn’t than by what it is: fic without romantic or sexual content. But even this is an arbitrary division, as many long, plot-centric stories fall into the gen category despite a kiss or two. Where do we draw the line and, once it has been drawn, what do we do with it? Is genfic a license to explore the wider world of canon, to take characters on ascetic and moral quests? Or is it fic without the “good stuff”?

“They must be crazy!”: Moderating a Large Community
Jennifer Clack, Danijo, Sheryll Townsend
Ever wondered what happens behind the scenes at your favorite Harry Potter forum? Well, we can tell you! This panel will discuss the joys and trials of moderating a large forum. Moderators from FictionAlley and Harry Potter for Grownups will talk about their experiences. From logistics to funny anecdotes, we’ll give you a picture of a day in the life of a moderator. Plenty of time will be allowed after our presentation for questions.
Sponsor: FictionAlley eMentors

You Only Think It’s Magic: Operating a Fandom Website
Simon Branford, Amy Tenbrink
Running a fandom website opens a Pandora’s Box of operational issues, many of them unnoticed and unconsidered—that is, until it’s too late. How do you design a fanfiction intake system? Do you need a Terms of Use? How will you manage your users? How should you handle public criticism? This presentation will cover many of the common operational issues encountered by fandom websites, focusing on those websites that include content created by others. Please note that, for professional reasons, specific legal advice cannot be provided, but significant time will be allotted for questions, so please bring yours.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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WORKSHOPS

Accessories Make the Girl: Luna’s Butterbeer-Cork Necklace
Amy Wilson
Looking for the perfect finishing touch for your Luna costume? Learn to make your own butterbeer-cork necklace! Materials will be provided.

The Art and Science of Harry Potter Fanfic Drabble Writing: A Well-Done Drabble is Like a Fine New Orleans Jambalaya
Kerry (Snapeophile), Acadia elle, Veronica Atkins (LupinTonks85), Nikki C. (charmed3), Sunshine Dee, Gina Gadd, Carrie Harris (Droxy), JenKM1216, Karelia, LariLee, Natasha (Hogwarts Honey), Tempest Of Dreams
Join us for an interactive presentation and writers’ workshop as we explore the phenomenon of Harry Potter fandom drabbling. As a group, we’ll analyze the science of drabbling and critique some published pieces, developing a basic drabble ‘recipe’ that will allow participants to improve, refine, and create their own 100-word fictions. The writers’ workshop will use our discussion as groundwork for the art of drabbling. Members of the LiveJournal GrangerSnape100 community’s drabbling team will actively coach and support you.

Bringing It to Life: The Costumes in Harry Potter
Vikki Ortone (Moony)
You’ve read the books and watched the movies. You may have even written some fanfiction, but have you dressed up yet? Join Moony of www.MoonyCouture.com as she goes over the basics of putting together the perfect Harry Potter-inspired costume, where to get the pieces, and even how to make them yourself!

Creating the Perfect Hogwarts Scarf (and Other Magical Accessories)
Amy L. Miller
Always wanted that perfect scarf to complete your Hogwarts robes? What about a unique wand or house sweater? If you have basic knitting skills, or are willing to learn, you can create your own Hogwarts scarf. Bring along two colors of yarn and a pair of needles, and you can get a jump start! We’ll also take a quick look at simple ways to create your own wand, turn a thrift store pullover into a uniform sweater, and other fun Harry Potter-inspired craft ideas.

Divination: Useful Tool or Woolly Science?
Amy Goetz, lyric apted
“My dear, are you in the beyond?” Like the spark buried in the ashes awaiting discovery, our intuition lies deep within us. In this workshop we’ll look at the world of Harry Potter and the messages given through the text about the differing utility of divination and intuition. The goal is for participants to walk away with a firm and deepening understanding that there are thousands of messages in the everyday world waiting for us to interpret them. This workshop will offer the opportunity for people to actively explore and play with divination tools, such as tarot and soul cards.

Engaging the Ages: Planning Harry Potter Events and Activities for Kids to Teens
Alison Luperchio
Kids as young as kindergarten love Harry Potter. First and second graders read the books and want to playact. But older kids are interested, too. What kinds of activities can you plan for events and parties that bring Harry down to the lowest age level? How do you scale activities to deal with multiple age groups? This session invites everyone to participate in sample activities and discusses how to design activities for multiple age groups, and then (time permitting) the floor will be open for a discussion and exchange of ideas.

The Hysterical Hystorian’s Book Repair and Preservation Academy
Hysterical Hystorian
Madam Pince need only cast Reparo! to fix books that have been improperly used by ham-fisted students. We Muggles, though, need a bit more than wand-waving. Participants will learn how to care for books and manuscripts with basic environmental tips and simple repair techniques.

In Search of the Fanged Plot Bunny: Generating Ideas for Fan and Original Fiction
Jennifer Racek (Tapestry)
The basis of any good fiction is a tiny idea in the author’s mind that suddenly expands into a raging monster of a story demanding to be told. For J. K. Rowling that journey began on a train ride. For many others it can begin in writing workshops, by exploring various idea generation techniques. From canon-combing to free association and character interviews, this workshop will help authors to find the ideas that excite them and make them want to write.
Sponsor: The Quidditch Pitch

Magic Pencils: Drawing Harry Potter’s World
Marjorie Cohee Manifold
This workshop will help you turn your fantasies into fantasy art. Ready to capture a bit of magic on paper? Bring a pencil and join in!

Using Improv Techniques to Improve Your Writing
RM
Participants will be led through a series of improvisational acting exercises, which will then be used to address and solve specific challenges in fanfiction writing. Exercises will focus on Being Specific, Accepting Gifts, and Understanding Status in both generalized and Harry Potter contexts. Participants should wear comfortable clothes and be prepared to move around; all exercises can accommodate the differently abled. No previous acting experience is required.

What a Witch Wants—Jewelry!
Elise (elseinane)
Not every artist uses pen, paint, and paper; sometimes the lure of gleaming silver, shimmering pearls, and glittering crystals can be potent catalysts for latent creativity. The workshop will discuss the basics of beading regarding: various types of stringing materials, different bead shapes and sizes, findings, clasps, and the tools that are required to start creating your own designs. We will be limited in supplies for 25 participants, since everyone will create a House bracelet. The only materials that students need to provide are imagination and creativity.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS

4 Privet Drive . . . It’s Not Just about the Dursleys Anymore
Renee L. Antoine
Though the Dursleys encompass a small part of Harry’s life in each novel, their characters have developed from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone through Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. With the addition of Arabella Figg as a Squib in Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter’s Little Whinging becomes a two-family town, thus changing the scope of Harry’s Muggle world dramatically. While some characters’ evolution has been more superficial than others, this roundtable will discuss how their transformations may help or hinder Harry Potter in his quest during Book Seven.

Ambition, Power and Manipulation: Slytherin House
Jenna
J. K. Rowling’s vehement views on power and ambition come into play not only in her Ministry of Magic characters, but in her depiction of Slytherin House. While some of the bias can certainly be attributed to Harry’s limited third-person point of view, the string of jerks, sycophants and bullies that comes out of Slytherin House transcends merely Harry’s perception. Is Slytherin House nothing but selfish, manipulative louts? Is ambition inherently bad? And if not, why does J. K. Rowling portray it so one-dimensionally?

Because She’s Worth It: Tonks as the Postmodern Woman
Kirstee Byrne
A new hairstyle with a blink, a new nose without the pain and expense of surgery, or a new eye colour without the discomfort of contacts. With her Weird Sisters t-shirts and her cockney slang, Tonks represents a bridge between the school-aged Harry and the adults who seek to control his life. But to millions of female readers, Tonks is a thoroughly modern witch with her inbuilt beauty salon, sassy style and dangerous and highly sought-after profession. This roundtable will look at the character of Tonks—is she a modern feminist ideal, or simply a dreaded Mary Sue?

But Mom and Dad, It’s Only Harry Potter
Alison Luperchio
Boy wizard Harry Potter, with his distinctive scar and glasses, has become as recognizable as any Hollywood star, and early readers are known to practice their budding reading skills on J. K. Rowling’s series. As Harry matures, so do topics and themes within the texts. How can a parent or caregiver prepare for and answer the questions that are raised in the books, including prejudice, bullying, use of illicit substances, stealing, cheating, lying, and perhaps most frightening of all, Harry’s Chest Monster? Join other parents, caregivers, and teachers who read the books to or for children to discuss tips and experiences for navigating the wizarding world and using it as a springboard for opening dialogue between youth and adults.

Coleopterology
PyrateM
Just what is the latest gossip on that fabulous member of the press we all know and love (or loathe)? The character of Rita Skeeter, journalist for the Daily Prophet, makes her first appearance in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and begins affecting the storyline for better or worse. How have her actions changed Harry’s life? Is she to blame for the wizarding world’s disbelief in the return of Voldemort by discrediting our scarred hero? And alternatively, should she be praised for bringing Harry’s account of the Dark Lord’s return into the homes of every witch and wizard later in the storyline?
Sponsor: hp-ohio

Crossing Age Lines in Fan Fiction
Veronica Atkins (LupinTonks85)
This roundtable discussion examines pairings in fanfiction with an age difference of twenty years or more, such as Harry/Remus or Hermione/Severus. This age difference is often called cross-generational. We will discuss both cross-generation slash and het and why we read fanfiction with such large age differences.

Dissecting Fear: Tom Riddle and Voldemort
Amy Tenbrink
Prior to Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Tom Riddle’s character—and to a lesser extent, Voldemort’s character—was unclear. Tom features as a plot device in Book Two and Voldemort spends most of his time off the page, leaving Harry to battle Death Eaters. In Book Six, however, J. K. Rowling carefully paints a complicated portrait of an antisocial boy, a charming teen, and a power-mad adult who transcends his identity by sacrificing his humanity. This roundtable will discuss Tom Riddle’s motivations, Voldemort’s mechanisms of leadership and terror, and the effect of Rowling’s choices for this character. Ultimately, what makes Voldemort terrifying?

Divination, Prophecy and Misdirection
Rennie Guedel
The Harry Potter series includes many examples of J. K. Rowling’s ambiguous take on the validity and importance of prophecy. In a world where Divination is a school subject, the idea that the future can be predicted accurately is often treated with ridicule and disdain, yet core elements of the plot hinge on the interpretation and fulfilment of prophecy. Is Harry’s journey predestined, or will he be able to choose a future free of the shackles of predestination?

Flinching in the Face of Evil: Draco Malfoy
Jenna
Draco Malfoy, more than any other character, has enjoyed a rabid online following while remaining fairly minor in the Harry Potter series itself, at least until Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. While previously he was limited to Son of Death Eater, Nominal Archenemy, and Ooooooh Inquisitorial Squad Member, Draco’s plot finally emerged. Charged with killing Dumbledore, Draco failed. Instead, his early attempts were amateurish, and in his last attempt, before he spoke the Killing Curse—or perhaps after he had determined that he couldn’t—Snape, bound by an Unbreakable Vow, took the decision away from him. Where does Draco’s motivation lie on the spectrum between his father’s dark devotion and his mother’s love, and where is he headed?
Sponsor: hp-ohio

Ginny Weasley: Hot or Not?
Kirstee Byrne
Do you play Quidditch? Are you a sucker for a good Bat-Bogey Hex? Do you melt in the face of fire-red hair and warm brown eyes? Ginny Weasley may be the girl for you. Ex-girlfriend, Quidditch player, member of Dumbledore's Army... Love her or loathe her, Ginny has the ability to split fans, destroy ships and break Michael Corner—I mean, Dean Thomas—no, sorry, Harry Potter’s heart. But in the bright glow of Ginny’s newly outgoing personality, there’s a dark seed of doubt: is she just a thinly-veiled “Mary Sue”? Join us for a discussion of the youngest Weasley and help us decide . . . Ginny Weasley: Hot or Not?

The Good ’Ship Granger-Snape
Hilary K. Justice (Ariadne)
To those who ship HG/SS, the pairing seems obvious: let us not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments (like age, moral polar-opposition, and—oh, yes; up until the incident on the Tower, he was her teacher). The ’ship constitutes the bulk of fanfic submissions on many archives, and its Yahoo! group, WIKTT, has over 10,000 members. Why is it so popular? Is it just the marriage of true minds? Or . . . what? What is it about this ’ship that so bewitches our minds and ensnares our senses?
Sponsor: The Petulant Poetess

“He's still god be!”: The Heroism of Neville, Luna and Ginny
Amber Charleville
The first four books of the Harry Potter series unquestionably create a trio. Harry, Ron and Hermione are more powerful, more clever and more effective together than apart. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling creates a new trio, a group ostracized by either the Hogwarts student body or the original trio itself. Yet in Order of the Phoenix, Neville, Luna and Ginny prove themselves to be as clever, as powerful and as brave as the original trio—while also adding their own special strengths. What has motivated J. K. Rowling’s expansion of the ranks, if you will? And what do the characters of Neville, Luna and Ginny say about being a hero?

Hermione’s Helping Hand: How the “Brains” of the Trio Has Aided in Harry’s Heroic Journey
Christine Lee Gengaro
Roundtable participants are invited to discuss Hermione’s contribution to Harry’s heroic journey, as well as the types of help she has offered to Harry in the academic and social realms. This discussion will also explore the issues of human rights and justice that have affected her and, through her influence, Harry and Ron.

How to Build a Better Fandom Through Archives
Annie, Trisha Masen (simons_flower), Melanie (Dream_wia_Dream), Minnie (madam_minnie)
The Captains of The Quidditch Pitch will lead a roundtable discussion of how to build a better fandom through the archive process. They will begin with a background on The Quidditch Pitch and move towards an open conversation about archiving. Topics will include growth, encouraging new writers and artists, and the stigmas associated with fandom.

“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are.”
Liz Taylor, Rachelle N. Yeaman
Beyond the obvious issues of the prophecy and the Sorting Hat, in this roundtable we would like to examine the choices of different characters. How do characters such as the Blacks, Severus Snape, Tom Riddle, Peter Pettigrew, and Cornelius Fudge define themselves through what they do? How does the fandom define them? Discussion will range over the morality and “goodness” of choices, the implications of the choices that have been made, and what fandom takes away—or doesn’t take away—from these examples.

Lost in Translation: Cinematic Choice and Content Under Question
Michael C. Bolton
In adapting the wildly popular Harry Potter series, beloved aspects of the text are inevitably changed to fit cinematic constraints. Obviously, descriptive elements aren’t necessary to narrate or articulate because the films can show us Hogwarts’ moving staircases or Quidditch games. Yet, what about what’s truly lost in adaptation? Does the cinematic glamorization of Hermione lessen her impact as a character? How and when is knowledge assumed on the part of the viewer (e.g., cinematic Neville’s reaction to the Cruciatus Curse)? What do these changes, both the monumental (the conspicuous absence of political content such as S.P.E.W.) and the middling (if there is any such thing as a “minor change” for the fan spectator), say about who the movies are really made for? This roundtable will engage with textual changes from page to screen and use a range of theoretical perspectives to address how these changes affect fans and our relationship to the text.

Marketing and Advertising of All Things Harry Potter
Becky McConnell
This roundtable will discuss the effect of the media on the advertising and marketing of all things Harry Potter. We will also taken Harry back in time to 1939, when Gone with the Wind was released. How would he fare? What would have been done to advertise Rowling’s books?

Merry Pranksters: Fred, George and the Travails of Tricksterism
Catherine Tosenberger
Fred and George often get a bad rap in fandom, so here is the space for the few and the proud to come and share their twin-love! We will study Fred and George’s mythological antecedents, examine the folklore of twinship, and discuss the twins’ portrayal within both fanfiction and fan scholarship.

No Precedence Over Others: Hufflepuff’s Round Table
Merry Contrary
“Said Hufflepuff, ‘I’ll teach the lot, and treat them all the same’” (Order of the Phoenix 11). Hufflepuff House is widely regarded, by Hogwarts students and Harry Potter fans alike, as the least of the Hogwarts Houses, the dumping ground for those not special enough for any of the other Houses—even after a Hufflepuff was chosen as the best Hogwarts had to offer by the Goblet of Fire. This roundtable will discuss Hufflepuffs in the books we have, the book to come, and fandom at large, and finally ask the question, “What’s so daft about loyalty, hard work and inclusivity?”

Organizing and Editing Fandom Newsletters
BeccaFran
Editing newsletters is full of challenges. Come discuss what works and what doesn’t, get advice from your peers, and talk about the place of newsletters in fan communities today.
Sponsor: The Daily Snitch

Percy Weasley, You Prat
Jackie, Amy Wilson
Fans of the Harry Potter series often speak of character redemption—but usually apply it to Draco Malfoy. This roundtable will, instead, focus on a character who was originally “good” and who has never really been evil: Percy Weasley. What caused Percy to abandon his family loyalties for the service of the Ministry? What has kept him there? Power? Prestige? A love of rules? What role does Percy still have to play in a series that very much revolves around family and loyalty? Will he return to the embrace of his family? And before he does, will his adopted loyalties aid the Dark Lord? Is Percy the prodigal son, a future Death Eater, or just an expendable character due to be on the wrong side of a Killing Curse in Book Seven?

The Phoenix and the Snake: Images of Immortality in Harry Potter
Josephina Manifold
Immortality is a recurring theme in the Harry Potter books. Three major characters—Harry, Dumbledore, and Voldemort—are associated with the snake and the phoenix, two animals that often symbolize this idea. In this roundtable we will briefly learn how and why the snake and the phoenix represent immortality, and we will discuss what this might lead us to conclude about the three characters most heavily associated with these animals.

Rising Above Situational Ethics: Raising Phoenixes in a World of Crows II
Gina Burkart
During an era in which situational ethics are demonstrated daily by leaders and athletes, literature like Harry Potter can provide fertile ground for discussing and fostering moral development in children. Rather than fearing the senstive discussions prompted by the series, parents, teachers, and caregivers can use the novels as a gateway to open communication. This roundtable discussion is a companion piece to the workshop “Rising Above Situational Ethics: Raising Phoenixes in a World of Crows,” but attendees who wish to attend only the roundtable are welcome.
Sponsor: The Daily Snitch

Sirius-ly Celibate?: Sexuality and the Adults of Harry Potter
Nancee Lee-Allen
Many people find Sirius Black to be the sexiest character in the Harry Potter series, though no one knows whether Sirius ever had a date! His love life is never mentioned in the books since there are more compelling things to know about him. James appears to be the only Marauder to find love. During the roundtable, I propose an open discussion regarding sexuality and the adults in Harry’s world. Some questions to explore: Can Lupin be happy with Tonks? Would Sirius be any less sexy if he had a girlfriend (or boyfriend)? Would Snape be nicer if he dated once in a while?

Snapeslash and Its Fans
Annamaria Lombino (Titti)
Back when fandom was at its infancy, Snapeslash, regardless of the pairing, was considered rare. Snape fans usually came from other fandoms and tended to isolate themselves from the rest of fandom. They created the Snape Slash Fleet, which negated the need to use fandom-wide archives. They followed rules imported from their previous experiences with fan works. With time, things have changed and Snape-love has exploded. Has this beginning impacted Snapeslash and its fans? Is this corner of fandom different from the rest?

Trelawney: Seer, Charlatan . . . Squib?
Rennie Guedel
This character-specific roundtable will attempt to extrapolate the many facets of Sibyll Trelawney’s personality and motivations from the relatively minimal information provided in the Harry Potter series. If you’re a fan of the character, or even if you’re merely interested in exploring aspects of Sibyll’s role in the books you might not have previously considered, please join us for some conversation and speculation.

Walking a Mile in Their Shoes: Roleplaying in the Harry Potter Fandom
Kia
If you ever, even for a fleeting moment, dearly wished you could attend Hogwarts with Harry, Ron and Hermione, you’re not the only one. Unfortunately, until we figure out a scientific method of breaking Hogwarts’ unplottable location, we’re doomed to rely upon the crutch of fantasisers, writers and dreamers everywhere—roleplaying. Whether we prefer games run via LiveJournal, message boards, chat-rooms, or AIM, or even the face-to-face activity of a LARP, roleplaying gives us as writers a truly unique experience to inhabit the head-space of canon an original characters in J. K. Rowling’s world. Join us for a discussion of all things roleplaying—format, characterisation, canon vs. AU, and anything else you can think of!

Weasley Is Our Queen
Maud O’Bedlam
Ron Weasley is probably not the first character who springs to mind when fans think of slash fiction. But the Ron slash community is alive and lively, if sometimes a little difficult to find. Join us to profess your Ron-love and discuss the whos and hows of a character that much of the fandom considers the least slashable in canon.

Witch Weakly
Liz Taylor, Rachelle N. Yeaman
In the course of this roundtable, we would like to look at the role of women in Harry Potter and explore why fans are so hostile or sycophantic towards certain female characters. Discussion may include why fans hate Ginny so much, why they find Hermione to be an also-ran character, and why the only truly powerful or strong depictions and roles for women are occupied by those who are deemed slightly (or extremely) deranged. We would like to explore this through garnering views on characters such as Bellatrix Lestrange, Dolores Umbridge, and Narcissa Malfoy in comparison with Molly Weasley, Tonks, and Minerva McGonagall.

Wizarding War
Jackie, Amy Wilson
From the elephants of Hannibal to the guerrillas of the American Civil War to the propaganda of World War II, tactics of war have been varied, creative and brutal. Some campaigns assault the defensive force, some manipulate the mind, and others target civilians. This roundtable will examine the tactics of war used by wizards, discuss how they differ from traditional Muggle approaches, and analyze how effective each method has been.
Sponsor: Atlanta HP

“Yes, but the world isn’t split into good people and Death Eaters.”
Liz Taylor, Rachelle N. Yeaman
Snape’s Worst Memory stirred up a lot of questions among fans: how good are the good guys, how bad are the bad guys, and who was justified in doing what to whom? As previous online debates have proven, this is not a black-and-white issue, and there is little to no consensus on how to interpret the scene or the characters. Come hash it out (politely, of course) with your fellow fans.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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ADDITIONAL PRESENTATIONS

Babbling about Drabbling: The Big Deal about the Littlest Fics
Cedar, Starrysummer
Sometimes the shortest fics can be the most difficult to write. At this combination panel and workshop, drabbles — stories of 100 words — will be analyzed, discussed, and created. Whether you’re a seasoned drabbler or have never written a fic under a thousand words, this is your chance to talk about the challenges and joys of creating a short yet complete work of fanfiction. Attendees will have the opportunity to create and read their own drabbles and discuss their writing processes.

Building Community Through Archives
Annie, Trisha Masen (simons_flower), Melanie (dream_wia_dream), Minnie (madam_minnie)
Through this highly interactive panel and roundtable discussion, we will discuss how to build a community through archives. Among the topics we will address are these: (1) How do we as a fandom create a nurturing community within an archive? (2) What are the benefits of being a close-knit community, and how are these communities viewed by “newbies”?

But It’s Pastiche (Whatever That Means)!: Inspiration, Plagiarism and Infringement in Fanfiction
Suzanne Scott, Amy Tenbrink, Catherine Tosenberger
“Plagiarism” is one of the most timeless topics in fandom. This panel breaks down the legal and literary mores surrounding creations based on someone else’s work. What is plagiarism? How does it differ from copyright infringement? Can you plagiarize plots, ideas, characters? How does citation work in a literary, rather than an academic or legal, context? What is fair use? Is all fanfiction, by definition, plagiarism? Are these terms at all meaningful within a fandom context? This panel will articulate the way these terms function within the fields of media studies, literary history, and the law, and will be followed by a roundtable discussion of their place in fandom.

Do You Want to Go to Hogwarts?: How Living in Literature Brings It into Reality
Jessica Gray
Do you want to go to Hogwarts? When reading these books, many adults and children envision the world so clearly that they want to really live in that fictional space. In this presentation, see and hear how the Unitarian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, created a three-dimensional magical school of Hogwarts, where life imitated art and children learned that “real” magic is helping others. Then learn how you could do similar work with your own children and youth. Included is a sample lesson of Defense Against the Dark Arts (bring your wand).

Engorgio Type!: A Look at How Book Design Affects the Reading of Harry Potter
Amber Jansen
Few people realize the power a book’s design can have on a reader’s experience. Come learn about the book design of the Harry Potter series and how elements such as type, margins, and even page number placement can affect a reader’s enjoyment and interpretation of a story. The presentation will conclude with a design activity and group discussion.

Harry Potter Fan Films Screening
Pattie Beaven, Erin Pyne
The screening includes two short original Harry Potter fan films: “Sirius Black and the Secret Keeper” and “The Marauders’ Worst Memory.” After the films, the audience may ask the director and writers questions.

Phoenix Rising, A History
Amy Tenbrink, Hallie Tibbetts
Planning a large-scale event is a daunting task. The lead event organizers of Phoenix Rising will discuss the conference’s eighteen-month planning process, from the selection of New Orleans as a location to the development of the theme, from management of legal risk to pricing, from vetting programming submissions to motivating staff. If you’ve ever considered running an event of your own, or wondered why some elements made the cut and others didn’t, please bring your questions.

Rising Above Situational Ethics: Raising Phoenixes in a World of Crows
Gina Burkart
This presentation explains Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development and shows how Harry represents the various stages in The Half-Blood Prince. It also discusses how Harry looks at Dumbledore as a role model of the highest stage of moral development. During an era in which situational ethics are demonstrated daily by leaders and athletes, literature like Harry Potter can provide fertile ground for discussing and fostering moral development in children. A workshop allowing for audience interaction will demonstrate how to use The Half-Blood Prince to facilitate moral discussions with children.

Using Dark Magic for Good
Pattie Beaven
“Just because a wizard doesn’t use Dark Magic doesn’t mean he can’t.” This combination presentation / roundtable discusses the use of Dark Magic to achieve Good, citing canon references to show the “grey” area between Light and Dark Magic. After the presentation, the audience will be invited to discuss how Harry will be able to defeat or destroy the Dark Lord without destroying himself.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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FANFICTION READINGS

Animated Night; Of Debts and Debt Collection
Anastasia (TimeTurnerforSale)
“Animated Night”: Surrounded by the falling shards of her world as it is shattered from without and within, Hermione, torn between death and darkness, is forced to consider a third, unthinkable option. Of Debts and Debt Collection: Severus Snape gives voice to the exact art and subtle science of slow, deliberate seduction.

ConFanLitCon Con
notmonica, reading Mina de Malfois
At the request of “The Author” (who, like Mina, values her anonymity), notmonica (who is not The Author) will read “ConFanLitCon Con” from Mina de Malfois’s popular (fictional) series about the (fictional) Sanguinity fandom. Mina’s hilarious observations about her (fictional) fandom, (fictional) BNFs and the (fictional) fangirls will have you rolling in the aisles. Mina assures us that “no BNFs were harmed” in the making of this presentation. All of the “Mina_de_Malfois” stories may be found at LiveJournal and JournalFen.

Couldn’t Keep Him There; Damn Tornadoes
Maud O’Bedlam
“Couldn’t Keep Him There”: “I just need more time.” / “I don’t have any more to give you.” Ginny meets Harry for coffee and conversation in New Orleans in March of 2006. Damn Tornadoes: This fic is a mash-up of Harry Potter with the musical Damn Yankees. Ron sells his soul in order to become a champion Quidditch player named Ron Hardy and lead the Cannons to victory; Draco and Pansy, as demons, are trying to make sure he doesn’t back out of the deal; and Harry is both clueless and lonely. This excerpt features bad singing, Machiavellian maneuvers, and a slash cliche involving a cloakroom.

The Crossroads
Hogwarts Honey (Natasha)
Snape ponders his past in the last hours before Harry’s final confrontation with Voldemort. Based on a song, but not strictly a songfic.

Eshu’s Daughter
Jennifer Racek (Tapestry)
Kit Ellsington’s gift with animals has always set her apart. When she receives an invitation to attend Hogwarts, Kit is sure she’s finally found her place. But the Chamber of Secrets has been opened and Kit is about to learn just what it means to be a Muggleborn student in a castle gripped by fear and prejudice—because the Monster of Slytherin isn’t the only thing stalking the halls of Hogwarts.

Facilis Descensus Averno (excerpts)
RM and Kalichan
This multi-media story, which spans the mid-1960s to the present, focuses on the social circle of Lucius and Narcissa Malfoy, Rodolphus and Bellatrix Lestrange, Regulus Black, and Severus Snape. Time and attrition change many things. This excerpt, which stands alone, shows us what happens in 1996 when Hermione stumbles onto some of Snape’s old correspondence with the Malfoys. It includes the story as well as two letters among the three characters in the 1970s and ’80s.

Harry Potter and the Enemy Within; Harry Potter and the Chained Souls
Theowyn
These excerpts from “Harry Potter and the Enemy Within” and “Harry Potter and the Chained Souls” highlight how different plot devices can be used to vary one’s writing. In “Enemy Within,” Harry enters his sixth year at Hogwarts to find that his mysterious mental link with Voldemort is stronger than ever—and only Snape can teach him to control his nightmarish visions. In “Chained Souls,” Voldemort has risen to power once again, and Harry must find a way to defeat the evil wizard once and for all while contending with suspicions that threaten to tear his own allies apart.

The High Cost of Casual Wishes; Toasting Life
Carrie Harris (Droxy)
“The High Cost of Casual Wishes”: Miscommunication, misunderstanding, and Slytherin secrecy surrounding a plan based on love damages trust and severely tests a good marriage. SS/HG, post-HBP. “Toasting Life”: A concerned Albus Dumbledore counsels Severus Snape while they feed the squid stale toast.

A Leap Back into Faith; Discoveries
Snapeophile (Kerry)
“A Leap Back into Faith” is a response to the “Broken Memory Charm Challenge” from the GrangerSnape100 LiveJournal community. Community rules state that Severus, Hermione and the challenge topic need to feature in each drabble. Eight 100-word drabbles detail Hermione’s amnesia caused by an unknown curse from Voldemort. Snape is desperately trying to help her regain her memories. “Discoveries,” co-read with Carrie Harris (Droxy): Minerva sends an embittered, lonely Snape for therapy with psychiatrist Dr. Granger. Lots of snarky dialogue ensues. Can they resolve their issues with each other?

Mirror Mirror
Slytherincess
The invisible tendrils of the Mirror of Erised snake through the castle at night, culling the vulnerable, beckoning subconsciously to even the haughty and impervious. Dumbledore is wise to hide Erised away from prying eyes. A frustrated student destroys the mirror in a fit of rage, yet a lone shard of Erised’s glass goes unrecovered. It’s but a matter of time before the shard regenerates into an entirely new mirror—a mirror brimming with fresh, wicked magic. What could be more devastating to confront than the heart’s deepest desire? Hold up the mirror and see for yourself.

No Loyalty in the Moonlight; A Walking Shadow
Ariadne (Hilary K. Justice)
No Loyalty in the Moonlight (WiP): Set decades after the final battle. Some secrets aren’t meant to stay buried; Hermione must confront the ones she’s kept from herself. A Walking Shadow: Post-HBP, novel-length. Hermione returns to Grimmauld Place, looking for answers; she doesn’t expect to find Severus Snape. Together, they solve the Horcrux Indemnity problem: that each Horcrux’s destruction requires a sacrifice to balance the murder from which it was created. Who’s on the list of sacrifices? From seeming despair, a new phoenix arises, a phoenix born of chaos, desperation, and love.

The Overlooked
J. C. Sillesen
Snape discovers the existence of a magically gifted young woman who never received an invitation to study at Hogwarts. But as the final confrontation with Voldemort approaches, can Snape protect her from those around her . . . including himself?

The Reader
Aja
The Reader is set in Hogwarts during the height of the war. Told from Harry’s perspective in the midst of a school facing tragedy after tragedy, this story is about the ways in which people find strength in the face of horror, and the comfort they take from unlikely sources—in this case, Draco Malfoy. Draco unexpectedly finds himself becoming a spiritual guidepost for Hogwarts, when he stumbles into a series of readings from great works of literature throughout history. As Draco gives into the daily readings, he also discovers an inner strength that will change Harry as well as himself.

Silence and Esoterica; Morality for Beautiful Slytherins; Forever in Debt to Your Priceless Advice; The Spare (A Theme and Variations)
Cedar
A sampling of gen and shipfic, including “Silence and Esoterica,” a Snape fic in verse; “Morality for Beautiful Slytherins,” a pre-Half-Blood Prince fic in which Draco is given ownership of the house at 12 Grimmauld Place; “Forever in Debt to Your Priceless Advice,” in which Percy discovers grunge music in 2004; and “The Spare (A Theme and Variations),” a look at Cedric’s life during the year of the Triwizard Tournament.

Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others; Show Me Your Soul; One for Sorrow
Tarie (OfScarletWoman)
These three pieces showcase character studies of Slytherins, Gryffindors, and Hogwarts professors alike. The first takes a look at the struggles of Millicent Bulstrode as she comes to term with life and herself; the second explores the relationship of the trio and how desperate war can make a man; and the third examines fate and humility.

To Solve a Riddle; Move Along; Hurricane
Jennifer Finch
“To Solve a Riddle”: Harry and Ron are upset that they are missing Halloween with their wives when they’re called out on a special mission as Aurors. “Move Along”: The afternoon after Dumbledore’s funeral, from four viewpoints. “Hurricane”: What the Giant attack seemed like from the viewpoint of a Muggle.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


-------

ADDITIONAL PRESENTATIONS

Babbling about Drabbling: The Big Deal about the Littlest Fics
Cedar, Starrysummer
Sometimes the shortest fics can be the most difficult to write. At this combination panel and workshop, drabbles — stories of 100 words — will be analyzed, discussed, and created. Whether you’re a seasoned drabbler or have never written a fic under a thousand words, this is your chance to talk about the challenges and joys of creating a short yet complete work of fanfiction. Attendees will have the opportunity to create and read their own drabbles and discuss their writing processes.

Building Community Through Archives
Annie, Trisha Masen (simons_flower), Melanie (dream_wia_dream), Minnie (madam_minnie)
Through this highly interactive panel and roundtable discussion, we will discuss how to build a community through archives. Among the topics we will address are these: (1) How do we as a fandom create a nurturing community within an archive? (2) What are the benefits of being a close-knit community, and how are these communities viewed by “newbies”?

But It’s Pastiche (Whatever That Means)!: Inspiration, Plagiarism and Infringement in Fanfiction
Suzanne Scott, Amy Tenbrink, Catherine Tosenberger
“Plagiarism” is one of the most timeless topics in fandom. This panel breaks down the legal and literary mores surrounding creations based on someone else’s work. What is plagiarism? How does it differ from copyright infringement? Can you plagiarize plots, ideas, characters? How does citation work in a literary, rather than an academic or legal, context? What is fair use? Is all fanfiction, by definition, plagiarism? Are these terms at all meaningful within a fandom context? This panel will articulate the way these terms function within the fields of media studies, literary history, and the law, and will be followed by a roundtable discussion of their place in fandom.

Do You Want to Go to Hogwarts?: How Living in Literature Brings It into Reality
Jessica Gray
Do you want to go to Hogwarts? When reading these books, many adults and children envision the world so clearly that they want to really live in that fictional space. In this presentation, see and hear how the Unitarian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, created a three-dimensional magical school of Hogwarts, where life imitated art and children learned that “real” magic is helping others. Then learn how you could do similar work with your own children and youth. Included is a sample lesson of Defense Against the Dark Arts (bring your wand).

Engorgio Type!: A Look at How Book Design Affects the Reading of Harry Potter
Amber Jansen
Few people realize the power a book’s design can have on a reader’s experience. Come learn about the book design of the Harry Potter series and how elements such as type, margins, and even page number placement can affect a reader’s enjoyment and interpretation of a story. The presentation will conclude with a design activity and group discussion.

Harry Potter Fan Films Screening
Pattie Beaven, Erin Pyne
The screening includes two short original Harry Potter fan films: “Sirius Black and the Secret Keeper” and “The Marauders’ Worst Memory.” After the films, the audience may ask the director and writers questions.

Phoenix Rising, A History
Amy Tenbrink, Hallie Tibbetts
Planning a large-scale event is a daunting task. The lead event organizers of Phoenix Rising will discuss the conference’s eighteen-month planning process, from the selection of New Orleans as a location to the development of the theme, from management of legal risk to pricing, from vetting programming submissions to motivating staff. If you’ve ever considered running an event of your own, or wondered why some elements made the cut and others didn’t, please bring your questions.

Rising Above Situational Ethics: Raising Phoenixes in a World of Crows
Gina Burkart
This presentation explains Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development and shows how Harry represents the various stages in The Half-Blood Prince. It also discusses how Harry looks at Dumbledore as a role model of the highest stage of moral development. During an era in which situational ethics are demonstrated daily by leaders and athletes, literature like Harry Potter can provide fertile ground for discussing and fostering moral development in children. A workshop allowing for audience interaction will demonstrate how to use The Half-Blood Prince to facilitate moral discussions with children.

Using Dark Magic for Good
Pattie Beaven
“Just because a wizard doesn’t use Dark Magic doesn’t mean he can’t.” This combination presentation / roundtable discusses the use of Dark Magic to achieve Good, citing canon references to show the “grey” area between Light and Dark Magic. After the presentation, the audience will be invited to discuss how Harry will be able to defeat or destroy the Dark Lord without destroying himself.


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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GALLERY ARTISTS

Julian Black
The Hogwarts High Inquisitor
The Restricted Section

Maggie Bradshaw (Magsby) and Priscilla Spencer (Priscellie)
Young Remus

Emily
Toujours Pur

Cherié Hanson
The Witching Hour

Keith James Johnson
The Keeper of the Keys
The Letters From No One
The Sorting Hat
The Vanishing Hat

Kim Kiser
Morsmordre!

LeelaStarsky
The Boy Who Lived
Dumbledore's Army
Moony, Harry, and Padfoot
Wizards

Amber Lowery
Chudley Cannons
House Chaos
House Unity PR Style

Jennifer Ofenstein (ofenjen)
My Magical Lens

Pennswoods
A Life Unfinished
Trevor Suddenly Turned Orange
Watch What Happens to Longbottom's Toad

Phoenix Rising Artists: Emily Balawejder, Charlie James, glockgal, and Alice Wack
Selected Conference Art, Logos, and Concept Sketches

Priscilla Spencer (Priscellie)
Destruction
Dream

Glockgal and Priscilla Spencer (Priscellie)
Love Good


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth


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BOOTH STAFFERS

Art Critique Booth

Anastasia (TimeTurnerforSale)
Kathryn
Samantha Rose

Beta Booth

Brandy (WickedlyWanton)
Danijo
Valerie Estelle Frankel
Grey Thistle
Maud O’Bedlam
Tempest Of Dreams

Drabble Booth

Anastasia (TimeTurnerforSale)
Annie
Ariadne (Hilary Justice)
Blue Paris
Dream Wia Dream
ElectronicQuillster
emiime
Carrie Harris (Droxy)
Hogwarts Honey (Natasha)
JenKM1216
Karelia
Madam Minnie
Maud O’Bedlam
Simons Flower
Snapeophile (Kerry)
Tarie (OfScarletWoman)
Titti
Tsarina Amanda

Sketch Booth

Baron von Sasha, the Sasha of all ages
PyrateM


Papers and Lectures | Pre-empaneled Papers | Panels
Workshops | Roundtable Discussions | Additional Presentations
Fanfiction Readings | Gallery Artists
Booth Staffers: Art Critique Booth | Beta Booth | Drabble Booth | Sketch Booth

 
 
Google
WWW thephoenixrises.org

This conference is not endorsed, sanctioned or any other way supported, directly or indirectly, by Warner Bros. Entertainment, the Harry Potter book publishers, or J. K. Rowling and her representatives. All code and art copyright © 2006–11 Narrate Conferences, Inc.